LinKs to interesting web sites

The Eye

 

Three great tests of your color vision abilities

Beau Lotto's color games puzzle your vision, but they also spotlight what you can't normally see: how your brain works.

Stem Cells, Blindness And Why The Media Loves Miracle Cures

What is the Resolution of the Human Eye? Watch host Michael Stevens take a lengthy stab at it.

View from the Peripheral Retina  Actual view View from the Fovea

The smile on the face of the Mona Lisa is so enigmatic that it disappears when it is looked at directly, says Professor Margaret Livingstone of Harvard.

Stare at the dot in the color picture. The second picture is grey the entire time. When you keep your eyes in the dot, the picture is seen in color. When you look elsewhere it returns to black and white. How does your mind put all those colors there?

See how David Williams uses adaptive optics to view cones in the human eye. How this technique can be used to study color blindness.

What an infant sees. From PBS. From the Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute.

Visit the Exploratorium Exhibits. Try the fading dot and the sliding grey step.

Colour vision emerged because it helped our ancestors to forage for food.

Individuals who are blind to some colours are sensitive to a "colour dimension" that is inaccessible to those with normal colour vision.

Common Eye Diseases and Disorders.

What is 20/20 Vision?

Ishihara Test for Color Blindness.

Run your picture through Vischeck.
Original image Simulated image of vision in a person with deuteranopia (no green sensitive cone). This leads to an inability in distinguishing between red and green.
original image simulated image
Simulated image of vision with tritanopia (no blue sensitive cone). This leads to an inability in distinguishing between blue and yellow. Simulated image of vision in a person with protanopia (no red sensitive cone). This, just like  deuteranopia, leads to an inability in distinguishing between red and green.
simulated image simulated image

Copyright
Tutis Vilis
Department of Physiology
and Pharmacology

University of Western Ontario
London Ontario Canada

Last updated April 3, 2017
Comments welcome: tutis.vilis@schulich.uwo.ca